Philosophy

Abstract for Plato’s Immoralists and Their Attachment to Justice: A Look at Thrasymachus and Callicles. Dissertation submitted 2010. (c) 2010
The link above leads to the abstract (or brief summary) of my dissertation. I am revising what I wrote and hoping to turn it into a book, but it can be purchased in the form in which I submitted it at amazon:
Plato’s Immoralists and Their Attachment to Justice: A Look at Thrasymachus and Callicles. Dissertation submitted 2010. (c) 2010

Nietzsche’s Perspectivism Reconsidered. Written 1996, revised 2002. (c) 1996, 2002, 2012
I wrote this as a chapter for a dissertation to be entitled, “Was Nietzsche Moral?” However, I later changed my dissertation topic (twice). As far as I know, this paper offers an original analysis of Nietzsche’s doctrine of perspectivism and its relation to his view of morality. I considered trying to publish it in a scholarly journal, but that would require situating it within Nietzsche scholarship, of which there is a tremendous amount. Life is short, so instead I offer it here.

“Religious Aspects of Environmentalism,” September 2001. (c) 2001, 2012
I wrote this to deliver at a conference on the problem of technology in Washington, D.C., which was scheduled for the inauspicious date of September 11, 2001. The conference never occurred, and I haven’t done anything with this since. Looking over it now, in 2012, I find I might put one or two things differently, but it still seems interesting, so here it is.

Vices of Democracy: Plato’s Analysis and Its Relevance to Contemporary America. Written 2001. (c) 2001, 2012
I originally wrote this as a dissertation proposal, and there is a story behind it. Although the proposal had the firm support of my dissertation committee, the Committee on Social Thought faculty took the very unusual step of rejecting it. The proposal seemed to be a kind of Rorschach test. While the politically conservative faculty members on my dissertation committee found it an interesting project, many liberal faculty members found it unscholarly and grandiose. However, I later derived great satisfaction from the dissertation I actually wrote (see above), so perhaps all’s well that ends well.